Susan Byrnes

National Bronze Sculpture SymposiumSusan ByrnesCincinnati, Ohio
www.susanbstudio.com
Susan Byrnes is a visual artist whose early studies in photography, film and video, and later studies in traditional cast metal sculpture and audio production have resulted in the creation of art that encompasses a variety of media. Exposure to the work of choreographers Liz Lerman, Trisha Brown, and Bill T. Jones had a profound impact on her sculptural practice, and in addition to objects, she began to create works that included installation, sound and community participation. Susan’s current studio work involves the production of sound-objects and multi-media installations that respond to sites or narratives using traditional and experimental materials.
Of her work, art critic Kathleen Whitney (contributor to Sculpture Magazine) has observed, “Susan Byrnes’ work has an extraordinary presence…She merges intellect with emotion thus adding a strong element of self to her otherwise conceptual work. This combination produces objects that are deeply evocative, sensual, and innovative.” In 2009, Susan was awarded an Individual Artist Grant from the Montgomery County Arts and Culture District. She has exhibited widely throughout the Midwest including at the Dayton Art Institute, Woman Made Gallery in Chicago, the Museum of New Art in Detroit, Concordia University in Ann Arbor, and the Sculpture Center in Cleveland. She has also shown in New Mexico at the contemporary exhibition space 516 Arts in Albuquerque and the Harwood Art Center.
Susan currently works as an artist, freelance audio producer and independent curator, most recently developing the exhibition MEME: Culture In Transmission for the Herndon Gallery at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, OH. Her audio pieces, based on artists and artmaking processes, include stories on sculptor Patrick Dougherty, the Blue Sky Project, eco-artist Basia Irland, and video artist Jud Yalkut.

As a result of my discussion with the Mills Lawn Principal, themes of nurturing, community and the song “Red, Red Robin” emerged as relevant to the site and important to the school children and their families.

Each “nest” exhibits a simplified biomorphic approach to the overall form. Each nest contains an abstract surface pattern that reflects nature, harmony, and community: woven grass, a ripple in a pool of water, and a flowing stream.

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