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The Yellow Springs Arts Council appreciates support from the Yellow Springs Community Foundation.

Antioch College’s Cooperative Education Program

Antioch College Click on the logo above to learn more about this program!

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Ohayo Ohio Symposium Descriptions

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Titles in red indicate free events.

Pre-registration is required for all paid events.

Saturday 4/30 | Sunday 5/1 | Monday 5/2 | Tuesday 5/3

Wednesday 5/4 |  Thursday 5/5 | Friday 5/6 | Saturday 5/7 | Sunday 5/8

MULTIPLE DAY EVENTS

Cranes-smApril 1 – 30
1,000 Cranes for Peace

We invite the Yellow Springs community to join together and help fold 1,000 origami cranes for peace. This idea is inspired by the book Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr.  All through April, there will be an origami station with paper and instructions set up at the Yellow Springs Library, the Antioch Olive Kettering library, and the Yellow Springs Arts Council during the normal operating hours of each. If you would like to create your cranes at home, they can be dropped off at any of these locations. The cranes will be strung and displayed during the Japanese symposium, Ohayo Ohio, the first week of May. Not sure how to make an origami crane? Here’s a very clear tutorial that walks you through the steps.

28suginami-smApril 30 – May 31
Suginami: Photography by James Luckett
Chris K Gallery, 257 Xenia Avenue

Suginami is one of 23 ku, or wards, of Tokyo, an area of the city where James lived for 5 years. Houses and apartments there are sited tightly together; narrow streets and even narrower paths wind around themselves, forming a maze of walls, fences, gates and plants that carefully delimit private space from public. Daily walks took him in, around and through the margins of this area of the city for hours on end. Suginami is an exploration of the ways this landscape layers in the edges of a frame, of the transformation of light inside the dark box of the camera and of the space of discovery between the viewfinder and the eye.

Existence-smApril 30 from 9 AM – 5 PM and May 2 – 8 from 10 AM – 5 PM
The Power of Story, interactive installation piece by Sarah Strong
Art & Science Building, Student Gallery on the Second Floor
Antioch College Campus

The Power of Story speaks to the influence stories play in our lives collectively and individually.  Created by local paper artist Sarah Strong, guests and other artists are invited to participate by sharing a story of their own. The mixed media work shown here, “The Existence of Us” will be part of the exhibit. Stop by the gallery to learn more!

TEA-HOUSE-6--smMay 2 – 8 from 10 AM – 6 PM 
Antioch College’s Japanese Tea House Project Photo Exhibit
Foundry Theater Lobby, 920 Corry Street

The Japanese Tea House project began in 1975 as a summer, outdoor, hands-on class that continued to be offered by Harold Wright at Antioch College for a number of years and in a number of departments. All the work was done by students, and occasionally volunteer faculty, all materials were found in nature or at least recycled. Many students took advantage of the Independent Study format to do extensive work on the project including gardening and landscaping. Engineering majors gained credit in their field by designing the circulating ponds and waterfall systems; science majors researched and planted trees and other plants including moss. Tea was often served at the Tea House during intermissions at amphitheater plays. Harold and his TAs often offered outdoor classes in language and Japanese culture in the garden especially in spring and autumn. It was a favorite place to hold poetry classes. Many haiku poems were inspired by that tea house and garden. A description of the Tea House class was at one time published in The New York Times as part of a recruitment campaign for the college. The structure, once listed as one of the few authentic tea environments in the US, was a certainly a conversational piece of student-built architecture in Yellow Springs until it was accidentally burned down in the 1980s, At one time a delighted Japanese visitor made a calligraphed sign for the garden naming it GOBO-AN or the “Burdock Hermitage.”

kimonos-smWednesday, May 4 – Saturday, May 7 from 1 – 4 PM 
Kusakizome Exhibit
Herndon Gallery, South Hall, Antioch College Campus

A few of Mami Adachi’s exquisite hand-woven kimonos and shawls, dyed using kusakizome (natural dye technique), will be on display as part of the “Threads Bared” exhibit of contemporary fiber art by Denise Burge, Kate Kretz and Jacob Lynn.

Saturday, April 30

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FULL  Saturday, April 30 from 9 am – 4 PM   
Washi (paper making) Workshop by Tim Barrett & Sarah Strong
Art & Science Building, Room 107
Antioch College Campus

Experience all of the steps required to make paper using traditional materials and tools. The morning will consist of fiber preparation, including discussion of cooking techniques, picking, hand beating, and formation aids. Participants will have the opportunity to make paper using a traditional mold made in Japan and an inexpensive DIY alternative. During the lunch break the paper will be pressed. Participants will have the opportunity to attend Tim’s papermaking lecture before finishing up the day with parting and drying of their finished sheets. See examples of both Tim and Sarah’s papers on display. Cost per participant is $30, which includes all materials and a Japanese-style bento box lunch. Maximum of 12 students.  This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

TIMOTHY_BARRETT_5-smSaturday, April 30 from 1 – 2:30 PM
Papermaking Research and Practice: Antioch, Japan and Beyond by Tim Barrett
Art & Science Building, Room 201
Antioch College Campus

Barrett will begin with the story of how his interest in hand papermaking developed while a student at Antioch College in the early 70s. Over the next four decades his curiosity about aesthetics in handmade paper led to a Fulbright Fellowship in Japan, and a major research project on 15th century European papers. Following the 40 minute PowerPoint presentation, questions and discussion will be warmly encouraged. Paper specimens will be on display and available for inspection.

Scott-Sanders-smSaturday, April 30 from 4:30 – 5:30 PM
The Yellow Springs-Japan Connection: A History by Scott Sanders
Art & Science Building, Room 201
Antioch College Campus

Antioch College Archivist Scott Sanders will present a lecture highlighting the long history and connection of Antioch College and Yellow Springs to Japan. Earle and Barbara Reynolds are among the most interesting and internationally known villagers in the history of Yellow Springs. Sanders will speak on Earle’s scientific studies of the effects of the Hiroshima bomb on its people, their dramatic confrontation with the Atomic Energy Commission, and Barbara’s role in establishing the World Friendship Center. He will also speak on the College’s participation in the relocation program that brought several nissei students to campus to finish their educations, most notably Mari Michener, and briefly on the once-interned families who came to Yellow Springs during the war to work at the Antioch Bookplate Company.

Sarah-beating-fibers-smSaturday, April 30 7 – 9:30 PM
Opening Reception: The Power of Story by Sarah Strong
Art & Science Building, Student Gallery on the Second Floor
Antioch College Campus

Visit this must-see exhibition of installation and collaboration with the artists who are creating it. An evolving collection of stories from artist Sarah Strong, Antioch students and the community.

Sunday, May 1

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makizushi-smFULL  Sunday, May 1 from 11 AM – Noon and 2 – 3 PM 
Make Maki-Zushi with James Luckett 
Birch Kitchen
Antioch College Campus

Learn to assemble maki-zushi – rice and vegetables wrapped in nori seaweed to make the iconic rolled sushi dish known and enjoyed the world over. We’ll also learn about and sample a few other healthy and home-style dishes like miso soup, oshinko and nimono. Vegetarian and vegan friendly. Two separate sessions are being offered for $10 per person. Maximum 15 students per session.  These sessions are full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Calligraphy

FULL  Sunday, May 1 from 1 – 3 PM Introduction to Japanese Calligraphy Workshop with Migiwa Orimo
Coretta Scott King Center, corner of Livermore Street and East Center College Street

This is a hands-on Japanese calligraphy workshop in which participants will have a chance to produce calligraphic works. The workshop will also introduce participants to a key concept in Japanese spatial aesthetic, called ma. No knowledge of Japanese required. Materials will be provided. Cost per person is $10. Maximum of 10 students. This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Sashiko-Mending-smSunday, May 1 from 4 – 6 PM
Sashiko Workshop by Nadia Mulhall
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

Sashiko, an ornamental mending technique that originated in 17th century Japan, was derived from the value of mottainai or ‘too good to waste,’ an idea lacking in the modern consumer lifestyle. This workshop will focus on mending clothes with these techniques; participants are invited to bring their holey pants, socks, shirts, jackets, and sweaters. All other materials will be provided. Aimed at students at least 13 years old, the cost is $5 per participant. 

FULL  Sunday, May 1 from 4 – 6 PM 
Drawing in Space: Bamboo and Paper Sculpture Workshop with Migiwa Orimo
Coretta Scott King Center, corner of Livermore Street and East Center College Street

In Japanese culture, bamboo and simple white paper hold much metaphor. Participants create simple and elegant sculptures using bamboos and white papers. Participants will also learn about ma, a little known concept of Japanese aesthetic. Ma is a Japanese aesthetic principle meaning “emptiness” or “absence.” It is the space between objects, the silence between sounds, or the stillness between movements. The workshop is intended for participants on multiple levels, as each person will build on their individual skillset for making sculpture. All materials/tools are included in the cost of $10 per person. Maximum 10 students.  This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Tanya-Maus-smSunday, May 1 from 7 – 8:30 PM
Japanese Environmentalism: 20th Century Challenges and Activism by Tanya Maus
Herndon Gallery, South Hall
Antioch College Campus

Grassroots Japanese social and political movements are often viewed as nonexistent or ineffective due to, among other things, the cultural stereotyping of individuals in Japan as inherently passive and/or apolitical. This lecture, though briefly touching on 18th century intellectual environmental thought in Japan, is devoted to discussing environmentalism and environmental activism in Japan from the Ashio Copper Mine pollution incident of the late 19th century to the Fukushima nuclear disaster in the present.

Monday, May 2

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Tea-Ceremony-smFULL  Monday, May 2 at 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 PM
Ryuurei-shiki Tea Ceremony by Ayako Tomioka  
Casa de Paz, 1315 Corry Street

Please come to learn about one form of Japanese tea ceremony called Ryuurei-shiki. In this style, participants are seated in chairs rather than in the traditional manner of sitting on the floor. Tomioka will perform and demonstrate in this style, introducing a history of tea ceremony and offering a presentation with pictures and videos. She is pleased to share her Japanese culture thorough the ancient practice of tea. Cost is $5 per person. She will lead the ceremony for three groups of 5 people. All three sessions are full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so, including the session you can attend, to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Luckett.two---smMonday, May 2 from 7 – 9 PM
Opening Reception and Gallery Talk: Suginami by James Luckett
Chris K Gallery, 257 Xenia Avenue

Join us at the opening reception for James Luckett’s photography exhibit Suginami, in which James explores one of the wards of Tokyo through layers in the edges of a frame, the transformation of light inside the dark box of the camera and the space of discovery between the viewfinder and the eye. James’ book will be available for sale. Light refreshments will be available.

Tuesday, May 3

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Jonatha-&-Harold---Mail-Bag-smTuesday, May 3 from 7 – 9 PM
Japanese Storytelling by Harold & Jonatha Wright
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

For over 14, years, the Wrights collected stories from Japanese students studying at Antioch College and from books of Japanese stories. Harold translated these tales and they adapted them for oral telling. Their lively performances use authentic body language, gesture and facial expressions; in addition to Japanese words and names for people and places.

Wednesday, May 4

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eco-print-eucalyptus-and-onion-skins-with-iron-mordant-and-tea-smFULL  Wednesday, May 4 from 4 – 6 PM  
Eco Printing Workshop by Jackie Mulhall 
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

Eco printing is a natural dyeing method that prints the images of leaves directly onto fabric and paper using pressure and steam. While it is not a traditional Japanese art, we will be printing with leaves gathered locally to honor visiting natural dye artist Riko Mukai who formerly worked as an environmentalist at Glen Helen. Printing leaves collected from favorite walks can be a way to capture memories of that place. The results are experimental — each leaf is unique, and hidden colors drawn out from pigments in the plant can leave marks in unexpected ways. Designs can be created using the plants’ natural forms and textures. Participants will print leaf images onto paper and contribute towards a group project on silk. The leaves need to be in contact with the paper for 24 hours in order to print, so participants will need to return to the Arts Council building during open hours to pick up their print. This workshop is for children age 6 and up, but may be of greater interest to teens and adults. Parents, please accompany your child. Wearing old clothes is recommended. Cost is $5 per person. Maximum 12 students. This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

TEA-HOUSE-6--smWednesday, May 4 from 7 – 8:30 PM
The Japanese Tea House: Thatch, Mud and Learning by Harold Wright
Foundry Theater Lobby, 920 Corry Street

The Japanese Tea House project began in 1975 as a summer, outdoor, hands-on class that continued to be offered by Harold Wright at Antioch College for a number of years and in a number of departments. All the work was done by students, and occasionally volunteer faculty, all materials were found in nature or at least recycled. Many students took advantage of the Independent Study format to do extensive work on the project including gardening and landscaping. Engineering majors gained credit in their field by designing the circulating ponds and waterfall systems; science majors researched and planted trees and other plants including moss. Tea was often served at the Tea House during intermissions at amphitheater plays. Harold and his TAs often offered outdoor classes in language and Japanese culture in the garden especially in spring and autumn. It was a favorite place to hold poetry classes. Many haiku poems were inspired by that tea house and garden. A description of the Tea House class was at one time published in The New York Times as part of a recruitment campaign for the college. The structure, once listed as one of the few authentic tea environments in the US, was a certainly a conversational piece of student-built architecture in Yellow Springs until it was accidentally burned down in the 1980s, At one time a delighted Japanese visitor made a calligraphed sign for the garden naming it GOBO-AN or the “Burdock Hermitage.” Harold will include in his talk on the history of the Japanese Tea House photographs, a video and other documents.

Thursday, May 5

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Mami-Adachi-smFULL  Thursday, May 5 from 10:30 AM – 3 PM 
Kusakizome (natural dye) Workshop by Mami Adachi and Riko Mukai
Yellow Springs Methodist Church,  202 South Winter Street

Kyoto-based environmentalist Riko Mukai will begin by leading a group of participants on a nature walk in Glen Helen, demonstrating various leaves, nuts and other materials that can be used in kusakizome. After a break for a Japanese-style bento box lunch (included), her sister Mami Adachi will then lead students through all the steps required to dye silk and other materials with natural dyes using traditional methods. Participants will have the opportunity to dye both silk and cotton scarves with various natural dyes and mordants. A Japanese tea break and kimono demonstration will finish up the day. Wearing old clothes is recommended. Cost is $30 per person. Maximum 16 students; another session will be held on Saturday, May 7. This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Suminagashi-smThursday, May 5 from 4 – 6 PM  
Children’s Ikebana, Zen Garden Raking and Suminagashi (Japanese Paper Marbling) Workshop
Baha’i Center, 502 Dayton Street

An event for families to experience simplified versions of some traditional Japanese arts that can bring a feeling of peace and joy, led by Keith and Elaine Kresge.  These meditative activities are frequently used in children’s programs at the Baha’i Center to help children feel calm and focused as well as promote an appreciation for natural beauty.  Tea and Japanese rice crackers will be served. This event is offered as a service to the community and is not religious in nature. Participating in all of the activities will take about an hour. For ages 6 and up. Parents please accompany your children. Cost is $3 per child. Maximum 20 students.

Kimonos-Kyoto_JSouteyrat-9522-smThursday, May 5 from 7 – 8 PM
Kusakizome and Kimono” Gallery Talk by Mami Adachi and Riko Mukai
Herndon Gallery, South Hall
Antioch College Campus

In this gallery talk, Adachi will discuss her work and the process of kusakizome or natural dyeing, and the weaving and making of kimono. Japanese green tea and sembei will be served.  Following the presentation and kimono demonstration, questions and discussion will be warmly encouraged.  Several pieces of her kimono art will be on display and available for inspection.

Friday, May 6

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Haiku2Friday, May 6 from 7 – 9 PM

Haiku Slam
Foundry Theatre, 920 Corry Street

Come get your haiku on! This friendly, competitive haiku slam is emceed  by Antioch College literature student Tymber Compher. The evening begins with a few traditional haiku by Basho, a few haiku in Japanese by Antioch College Japanese language students, followed by four competitive rounds of haiku with four themes: Nature and Environment, Humor, Love and Angst, and Anything Goes. For each themed category you wish to enter, please bring three haiku, with your own rating of 1 to 3. In each round, you will read your third choice, then second choice, finishing with your best haiku. Audience will respectfully select the best haiku by means of foot stomping and finger snapping. The first place winner in each theme will receive a gift prize. Tea and snacks will be served. For questions or more information, contact Tymber Compher

Saturday, May 7

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Mami-Adachi-sm

FULL  Saturday, May 7 from 10:30 AM – 3 PM 
Kusakizome (natural dye) Workshop by Mami Adachi and Riko Mukai
Yellow Springs Methodist Church,  
202 South Winter Street

Kyoto-based environmentalist Riko Mukai will begin by leading a group of participants on a nature walk in Glen Helen, demonstrating various leaves, nuts and other materials that can be used in kusakizome. After a break for a Japanese-style bento box lunch (included), her sister Mami Adachi will then lead students through all the steps required to dye silk and other materials with natural dyes using traditional methods. Participants will have the opportunity to dye both silk and cotton scarves with various natural dyes and mordants. A Japanese tea break and kimono demonstration will finish up the day. Wearing old clothes is recommended. **The brochure incorrectly listed this as a free workshop.** Cost is $30 per person. Maximum 16 students. This class is full.

Raku-platter-smSaturday, May 7 from 10 AM – 4 PM  
Raku Pottery Workshop with Bruce Grimes 
Grimes Pottery, 3831 Wilberforce Clifton Road, Cedarville, OH 45314

Raku is a process for firing pottery and developed in 16th Century Japan. Raku ware was prized by the Japanese tea masters for its unique and timeless beauty. Metallic lusters and crackle glazes are the hallmark of the raku process. In the ancient raku tradition, each person will glaze a piece of pottery created by Bruce Grimes and will participate in the firing of their piece. With a practiced eye, Grimes will determine when the pots have reached the desired temperature (about 1960 degrees Fahrenheit) that causes the glazes to melt. While still red hot, the raku pottery is removed from kiln with a pair of tongs. The pottery is then placed into a container of combustible material (shredded paper and straw for this event). The chemical reaction between the burning of the paper and straw and the molten glazes creates beautiful and unpredictable effects on the surface of the pottery. Voila! Instant pottery! Cost of $20 per person includes a Japanese-style bento box lunch. Maximum 15 students. Registration is now closed but there are spots available. You may register at the door but will not receive lunch.

fishprint001----professional-smFULL Saturday, May 7 from 1:30 – 3:30 PM  
Gyotaku (Fish Printing) Workshop by Jane Black
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

Learn the Japanese art of fish printing in a workshop with local artist Jane Black, who learned the art of Gyotaku (“gyo” fish “taku” rubbing) in San Francisco in 1985. The process of applying ink or paint to a fish and making a rubbing on paper or cloth is part of the larger tradition of nature printing. The oldest known print was made in the 1800s during Japan’s Edo period. You will learn how to clean and prepare the fish, mix paint to the correct consistency, apply the pigments and create a monoprint. All materials are provided; wear appropriate clothing. You will have a few prints on rice paper and cloth to take home. Cost is $5 per person. Maximum 8 students. This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

fishprint002---newsprint-smSaturday, May 7 from 4:30 – 6:30 PM
Nature Printing with Fish by Jane Black
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

Nature printing is fun! Using rollers, tempera paint and newsprint, try your hand at the Japanese art of Gyotaku (“gyo” fish “taku” rubbing). Local artist Jane Black has been practicing this ancient art form for 30 years and will guide you through the process of applying paint and making a rubbing of a real fish during this drop-in activity.

Jonatha-&-Harold---Mail-Bag-smSaturday, May 7 from 7 – 8 PM
1,300 Years of Japanese Poetry in One Hour by Harold Wright
Yellow Springs Arts Council Community Gallery, 111 Corry Street

Thirteen Hundred Years of Japanese Poetry is a lively reading of Harold Wright’s own translations of his favorite poems. Beginning with a folksong or two from the most ancient times and the earliest love poems of the 8th century, the reading moves through examples of aristocrat tanka to the development battle poetry of the samurai. Then after offering Buddhist and Shinto inspired poems, he will read a number of 17 syllable haiku and the more humorous senryu. After reading from the poetry of the Empress Meiji and the Empress Shoken, who ruled during the modernization of Japan after 1868, the one hour program will conclude with readings of Western inspired free verse poets such as the “father of modern poetry” Hagiwara Sakutaro and the contemporary poet Tanikawa Shuntaro who, with Harold as his translator, was invited to perform at such places as The Library of Congress, the Guggenheim Museum and even Antioch College! CDs of the historic readings, as well as Harold’s A Story of Japanese Poetry Vol. I and II, will be made available for later listening.

Sunday, May 8

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shibori

FULL  Sunday, May 8 from 9 AM – 5 PM and Monday, May 9 from 6 – 10 PM  

Shibori Workshop with Karren Brito
Entwinement Home Studio, 111 Allen Street

Learn the shibori resist dyeing process on fabric. First a cloth is dyed, then a second dye is combined with a resist on the fabric by compressing the cloth with clamps or by stitching and gathering the cloth. The areas of cloth that are stitched or clamped will not take the second dyeing. No previous knowledge is required. Students must attend both days of this workshop.  Cost of $50 per student includes a Japanese-style bento box lunch on Sunday. Maximum 8 students. This class is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, send an email saying so to ysartscouncil at gmail dot com.

Cosplay---Brendon-Deal-smSunday, May 8 – meet at 2:30 PM and parade through town starting at 3 PM
Cosplay Parade
Courtyard of 100 Corry Street

Dress as your favorite character and join us for a cosplay parade! Cosplay is the practice of dressing up as a character from a movie, book, or video game, especially one from the Japanese genres of manga and anime. The parade will conclude in time for participants to attend the 4 PM showing of When Marnie Was There at the Little Art Theatre. All ages welcome!

MarnieSunday, May 8 at 4 PM     
When Marnie Was There
Little Art Theatre, 247 Xenia Avenue

When Marnie Was There will be the last film from the legendary animation studio Ghibli for the foreseeable future, and its themes of friendship, fantasy, and a quest for emotional strength fit snugly in the Ghibli canon.  The movie presents a sweet tale about learning to embrace our tragic pasts and differences not so we fit in but so we are comfortable on our own. Upon being sent to live with relatives in the countryside; an emotionally distant adolescent girl becomes obsessed with an abandoned mansion and infatuated with a girl who lives there; a girl who may or may not be real. It is filled with the luscious, beautiful 2D animation that we’ve come to expect from Ghibli. Suggested donation $5 per person.

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